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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

In Honor of Letterman's Last Late Show

Today the New York Times published this interview with David Letterman. The interview provides a personal account of Letterman's relationship with the audience, other hosts, and the greater media landscape that complements our discussion of entertainment media in class. The article links to prior media coverage of Letterman and highlight clips of the "Late Show."

In response to "Has doing the show taught you how much of yourself to give to an audience?" Letterman said: 
In the beginning, you think, I can’t wait to get on television. I’m going to straighten it out. Then people will be saying, “God bless you, Dave Letterman, we have been waiting for somebody to take care of television.” That’s how you feel. And now, I don’t feel that way.
If you're interested in Letterman's earlier interviews: here is a 1986 article with the New York Times and here is a 1989 interview with TIME Magazine. 

Entertainment, Baltimore, and the Future of the Media

A few more thoughts on social media
Jon Stewart goes after CNN for putting the White House Correspondents' Dinner ahead of Baltimore.


Class alum Tina Nguyen criticizes CNN coverage of Baltimore (and cites Pomona alum Conor Friedersdorf):



Pols on humor shows:
Criticisms of the Daily Show


Trust and Confidence

AP-NORC

ConGraph1.jpg

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Americans' Trust in the Mass Media
Trust in Mass Media, by Party
Add caption

Trust in federal institutions:

Trend: Americans' Trust in the Three Branches of the Federal Government
Recent Trend in Trust in the Legislative Branch of the Federal Government, by Political Party

Recent Trend in Trust in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government, by Political Party


Coverage of Baltimore Protests and Riots

The media coverage of the Baltimore riots has been interesting to follow because of the overemphasis on violence—"if it bleeds it leads". Coverage of looting and more violent protests diminishes the airtime for coverage of peaceful protests or community organized street clean ups. A young protestor, Danielle Williams, criticizes Thomas Roberts for MSNBC’s coverage of the unrest in Baltimore. "My question to you is, when we were out here protesting all last week for six days straight peacefully, there were no news cameras, there were no helicopters, there was no riot gear, and nobody heard us," Williams said. "So now that we've burned down buildings and set businesses on fire and looted buildings, now all of the sudden everybody wants to hear us."
This biased reporting has occurred across major news networks. “The Worst Moment of Fox’s Baltimore Coverage” an article on Mediaite, highlights Fox News Coverage of the Baltimore riots from Monday night. After focusing attention on buildings allegedly burned down by rioters, Megyn Kelly’s commentary shifted to an unrelated shooting in Brooklyn, New York. The network’s decision to pursue this story, insinuating that it was a related incident was extremely shortsighted:
“We’ve been keeping our eyes open for any related incidents, as we saw back during Ferguson, violence did break out in several other cities besides. Here you go. Here’s the Brooklyn live shot from overhead. So we will work to find out whether this is in any way connected to what we’re seeing in Baltimore. Which we don’t have confirmed.”
As Andrew Kirell of Mediaite confirms, the shooting was indeed unrelated to the Baltimore riots—the Brooklyn shooting was motivated by a local gang dispute.


Monday, April 27, 2015

Multiple-Topic Day!



First Couples and the Media (h/t Ben)

Playbook on the Brian Williams leaks.

Why senior thesis writers might seriously think about getting an upload exemption.  (Or, as Agent Coulson put it...)

Jim Tankersley writes at The Washington Post:
The number of news reporters in the Washington, D.C., area nearly doubled over the last decade, from 1,450 to 2,760. In Los Angeles it grew by 20 percent. In New York City, it basically stayed flat. Outside of those cities, in that same timeframe, one out of every four reporting jobs vanished – 12,000 jobs in total, according to the Labor Department.
Meanwhile, in the parts of the country that aren’t Washington or New York or L.A., nearly 20,000 new jobs sprung up in public relations, a 13 percent increase.

These are signs of the collapse of the business model for regional news outlets and of the forces pulling on journalists outside a few insulated cities. They are the reasons why, when it came to light this week that two new winners of the Pulitzer Prize had left their medium-sized newspapers for careers in PR, no one should have been surprised.
Survey of White House correspondents 

Happy 10th, YouTube!

Beware fakery!
Trust and Confidence

AP-NORC

ConGraph1.jpg

ConGraph6.jpg



Americans' Trust in the Mass Media
Trust in Mass Media, by Party
Add caption

Trust in federal institutions:

Trend: Americans' Trust in the Three Branches of the Federal Government
Recent Trend in Trust in the Legislative Branch of the Federal Government, by Political Party

Recent Trend in Trust in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government, by Political Party


Sunday, April 26, 2015

Required Viewing For Politics of Journalism (Except Maybe Seniors Finishing Thesis)

Every year, there exists a time for Washington to poke fun at itself: The White House Correspondents' Dinner. Here are the remarks from the two main speakers.

Cecily Strong, host of SNL note



President Obama himself


Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Courtesy of Ben, Here is the Reagan Sketch

The Evolution of Politics and Entertainment on TV


Nixon on Jack Paar, 1963:

  





Mort Sahl (see Lichter, p. 8):



Sahl on The Hollywood Palace, 1967:




 Clinton on Arsenio, 1992:



Saturday Night Live:


Limbaugh anticipates The Daily Show.  A 1996 segment:




Demographics of news audiences

Where audiences fit on the spectrum